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An Unexpected Afterlife, by Dan Sofer:

Set in East Jerusalem, An Unexpected Afterlife follows the journey of Moshe Karlin, a forty year old husband and father, who awakens from the grave two years after unknowingly leaving the world of the living, to find that he has been replaced by supposed best friend, Avi.

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As we learn more about Moshe’s predicament, others in his situation begin to appear, none any the wiser to the cause of their resurrection. I found Moshe’s character to be kind and humble, a true gentleman seeking to do what is right by his fellow man.

Lots of differing viewpoints were shown in regards to the subject of resurrection: some individuals branded it as science fiction and shunned our main characters, while a few accepted their tales of woe and were willing to help them back onto their feet.

Loss, love, and betrayal are key themes that I was able to identify.

Find it on Goodreads, HERE:

The author’s style was poetic and gave the impression that every word was carefully chosen for maximum emotional impact. His words formed beautiful images within my mind, as well as some not so beautiful.

A tale of life, death, and true rebirth.

Rated 5 stars.
Recommended for lovers of the paranormal.

 

 

 

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Living the Good Death, by Scott Baron:

Scott Baron is a master storyteller.

Never a dull moment. He has re-kindled my love of literature.

Living the Good Death, by Scott Baron is a fantasy novel unlike any other. Imagine being Death, but having been robbed of your supernatural abilities. The girl who thinks she is death (AKA Dorothy) finds herself stranded in the world of the living with no power, money, and no way to return to the realm of the dead. There’s only one thing for it- she must die!

I found myself drawn in from the start with the idea of this young, waif like girl being Death, reaper of souls. I didn’t know how to feel at first: part of me wanted to laugh at the irony and another part felt terrified for this poor, lost girl. Without a real name for a good half of the book, our heroine was lent an air of mystery tat I found most intriguing.

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At first, our protagonist appeared rather rude and hasty in her interactions with others, but this soon calmed as she spent more time in the company of others. After several failed suicide attempts, young Death / Dorothy, or however you would like to refer to her, begins to form some unique human attachments. We see her blossom into a determined and somewhat unlikely hero as she helps to shape the world into a better place.

What I loved most about the book is the relationship that formed between Dorothy, Randy (an art dealer), and Curtis (an eccentric mental patient.)

 

Find it on Goodreads, HERE:

All three interacted like old friends and formed a bond stronger than most I’ve seen in real life. Their witty banter and acceptance of each-other uplifted me, restoring some of my faith in humanity.

The only thing I found myself disliking came in the form of Doctor Vaughan, lead psychiatrist at Camview Mental Hospital, where Dorothy first meets Curtis. Vaughan’s sadistic methods of discipline and ridiculous obsession with magic make him an interesting, yet despicable villain.

Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed Living the Good Death. It was well written, with an elegant style that held my attention. The author articulates his thoughts well and surprises us on multiple occasions with bursts of action and suspense.

Best book I’ve read this season!
Easily 5 stars.

Recommended for lovers of young adult and fantasy books.

 

 

 

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Broken Branches Goes LIVE

To celebrate the official release of Broken Branches, by M. Johnathan. Lee, I thought we’d take another look at the review I gave it a few months back.

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Published by the unique Hideaway Fall comes
Broken Branches, a remarkable tale of an ancient family curse. Ian Perkin’s story is told through a reliable third person perspective. As a loving husband and father, he seeks to uncover the truth of the curse that has plagued his family for generations.

Author M. Jonathan. Lee has a way with expression and imagery, drawing particular attention to the gnarled tree in Ian’s family garden, which becomes a character in its own right. It acts as a sinister metaphor throughout the novel, a symbol of the family’s curse.

Buy it HERE     |     Find it on GOODREADS

At times, Ian’s character appears vulnerable, left emotionally scarred by the loss of family members over the years. At other times, he stands as a courageous father figure, hell bent on solving the mystery of the family curse and any obstacles that may arise.

This was a dark and sinister tale that held my attention from the first page. If you enjoy stories shrouded in mystery, deeper meaning, with sudden twists and good tension building, then I would recommend Broken Branches.

Rated 5 stars.

Thank you for joining me in celebrating the official release of Broken Branches.
I honestly cannot recommend this book enough.